How are Jammin Dyes made?

All of our tie-dyes are made by hand by the dye masters at the Jammin On Rainbow Studio in Novato, CA. We take pride in using made in America white goods, where ever possible.

Each of our apprentice Dye Masters has been trained by one of the brothers,- Jay, PaulSimon, or BenJammin – in the Jammin On tie-dye tradition. The masters continue to perfect their own craft. Japanese artist, Takefumi Omori, has put a whole, new twist on the vintage Spiral design and the Masters learned from him, while introducing Omori-san to American production techniques.

Let’s take a peek inside the  5000 sq. ft Jammin On Rainbow Studio in Novato, CA to see how we make rainbows come to life.

White goods are first soaked for 24 hours in a solution that helps dye set. Then each piece is carefully folded and tied, by hand.

First you soak, then you fold and tie, and then you DYE!
First you soak, then you fold and tie, and then you DYE!
Working on a big tapestry, the folds can get quite complicated
Working on a big tapestry, the folds can get quite complicated!
BenJamin at the folding table.
A stack of garments folded and tied, ready for color.

Then powdered dyes are mixed – to precise Jammin formulas – in bulk and then poured into ‘dripper’ bottles to allow for very precise color application.

Dye Master Zach Wright with visiting Dye Legend Takefumi Omori.
Dye Master Zach Wright with visiting Dye Legend Takefumi Omori.

Then the pieces are moved to the dyeing racks where the color is applied. Dye is applied to both sides to ensure full color penetration.

Dripping dyes on the "Spiral" lesson tapestries...
Dripping dyes on the “Spiral” lesson tapestries…
Mason, one of our Dye Masters applying color to a freshly tied garment at the Jammin On Color Factory in Novato, CA
Mason Boogie, one of our Dye Masters uses dripper bottles to allow for very precise color placement.
Close-up of drip dyeing
You have to imagine what it will look like when it’s unfolded….
PaulSimon Hard at Work
PaulSimon hard at work – Check out his exclusive Jammin ‘Bones’ series – they’re a specialty!
BenJammin at the table is a new backdrop that will unfold to 90 inches wide and 10  feet long.

Once color is applied, each piece is placed in the curing room for 24 hours allowing the dye time to be fully absorbed into the fabric. After that, each piece is unfolded, and taken to the wash room for three cycles to remove any excess dye.

Freshly dyed garments must sit for a full 24 hours so that the color is deeply absorbed before being washed twice.
Freshly dyed garments must cure for a full 24 hours so that the color is deeply absorbed.

Jeremy and Takefumi checking on the results os a finished piece. New designs are tested on large, flat pieces of cloth. Only the best designs are added to our growing collection of One-of-a-Kind Tie Dye garments.

Takehumi and Jay looking at Spirals
Reinventing the Spiral – a vintage design with a new twist

 

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